#21 – What It Means to Be a Strong Woman, with Suze Orman

It’s 2019, and women are still being judged for jobs on whether we’re likable enough, whether we’re strong enough (but not too strong), and all the same old patriarchal bullshit. That’s why we’re kicking off the new year and the new podcast season with one of the strongest women we know of: personal finance author, TV personality and all-around unapologetic woman Suze Orman.

She’s got a new book out, but we mostly don’t talk about that. Instead, we talk about her origin story, including how she earned the respect of the first boss in finance who hired her – with the intention of sleeping with her, not promoting her – what it means to her to be gay, and her advice for young people coming up in careers today.

Women & Money by Suze Orman, reissued in 2018

3 thoughts on “#21 – What It Means to Be a Strong Woman, with Suze Orman

  1. I thought this was a really great episode. I think that Tanja and Kara frame the discussion really nicely and they chose great excerpts from the interview to highlight.

    I was surprised to learn that Suze is from the Chicago area and went to the U of I. I grew up in the suburbs and live about an hour from the U of I now, so that made me feel closer to her.

    I didn’t remember that Suze is gay–doh–and hearing that part of the story was really interesting.

    I also appreciated how Kara and Tanja talk about how vulnerability is strength. And that not only the masculine is strong.

    My takeaways from this one are to remember that everyone has struggles, and that I can be strong in my femininity.

  2. I’m so confused about the contrast between Suze’s first job which she got, and kept, because of ground-breaking employment legislation that protects women from discrimination, and her statements that government will not help anyone and we all must look out for ourselves.

    Absolute statements about personal responsibility are as equally unhelpful as grousing about the man keeping you down while taking no action to improve one’s situation, but I found the lack of self-awareness here stunning.

    1. Brenna, Good point. I hadn’t caught that. I think Suze can make some pretty extreme, black and white comments at times, well, often really.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s